Making “personalization” more than an edtech buzzword

FolditI’ve been in the education technology industry, as a consultant or exec, for two decades. Over that time, a consistent objective has been how best to use personal computers (or computing power in other devices) to “personalize” education.

There’s been some success in narrow slices. Adaptive assessments that change test questions based on a student’s answers. eBook platforms that suggest books for students based on their interests and demonstrated reading ability. Mathematics instruction that tracks concepts students have trouble grasping, and attempts other approaches to teach it.

But a lot has also been blunt and inelegant. (And, sadly, ignores the very real and important role of a human teacher or parent in the process of kids learning.)

Over at GeekWire, I examine yet another attempt to “personalize” K-12 school instruction from an unusual genesis: scientific games. Seattle non-profit Enlearn has developed what it says is a new platform for “adaptable curricula.” And the inspiration is the protein folding game Foldit from the University of Washington.

Since the column appeared, Enlearn announced its first major commercial agreement, with educational publisher Voyager Sopris Learning.

Read about Enlearn’s approach, and a little about what’s come before, in “Seattle nonprofit Enlearn tackles thorny task: Personalize school with technology” at GeekWire.