A brief, personal, professional update

For those wondering: No, I haven’t completely abandoned working in education technology. But I have decided to no longer only do the kind of work I once was known for: edtech marketing consulting.

As a result, I said a fond (truly) farewell to my last client that was solely for marketing at the end of October, by mutual agreement. I won’t take any new clients for which all I’m being asked to do is advise on tactical marketing, in isolation. Whether a consulting, interim or potentially full-time role, what I do needs to be broader.

Because marketing itself doesn’t operate in isolation. And, honestly, being a consultant telling people what they usually don’t want to hear — that they have to change what they’re doing to improve their outcomes, rather than just do more of it, or tweak it — is like rechewing decades-old bubble gum. I’ve lost my taste for that.

I’ve said as much about marketing’s need to connect more broadly, beyond sales, to a number of my clients. I said it to colleagues in my most recent executive position as vice president of marketing strategy for West’s SchoolMessenger business, a role that ended after a reorg a year ago this November.

I’ve said it so often, that I fully expect my epitaph to be, “He was candid.”

What I am doing, for now, is taking a mental break. While I determined earlier this year that tilting my emphasis mostly toward freelance writing is likely not in my career DNA (I believe I filed it under “magical thinking”), that doesn’t mean I don’t like writing.

So, in early September, I began a brief period of fill-in work at the newsdesk of GeekWire, my long-time column and podcast home. I’m providing overall coverage and editing support for several weeks.

It’s allowed me to research topics I don’t normally get to dig into, providing a greater perspective on both edtech and the rest of the technology sector. I’m able to draw on decades of journalism and tech industry experience. And I get to work with very smart reporters of different ages from a variety of backgrounds.

When 2019 rolls out, I may remain a consultant. I may find a more substantial full-time role. It may be in edtech, or a related industry. Or it may be something completely different.

But it will be interesting.